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Miami Art Fairs – Day 2: Scope & Art Asia

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Miami Art Fairs – ArtMiami

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INDEFINITE STATES OF EMERGENCY: Helen Frederick a [...]

Scope and Art Asia were located in side by side pavillions. Look – more Obama! We did Scope first. For a really succinct analysis of the art basel fair scene, read “The Art Fair as Outlet Mall” in the NY Times today by Ken Johnson. Good stuff.

Installing Julia Fullerton-Batten’s ‘Teenage Stories’ and Martin Herbst’s ‘Judith.’

Derick Melander “Flesh of My Flesh”
The Girl Project? Not 100% installed yet…
Fernando Mastrangelo’s “Avarice”
Yes – these are plastic rodents. They reminded me a little of Baltimore!


Teeny tiny drawings of YouTube screens. Funny!

Andrea Pollan, Zoe Charlton, and Cliff Evans in front of video projection booth.

Baltimore artists in the Hamiltonian booth! Anne Chan, Jim Rieck, and Ian MacLean Davis below.
Works by Youngi Song Organ and Ian MacLean Davis.


Somehow the fair had it’s own Pernod booth, where you could sample Absinthe which has recently been legalized. Tastes like liccorice and is STRONG.


This was my favorite booth! The CTS or Creative Thriftshop, from Brooklyn, stood out for a number of reasons. The walls are PINK. The work had a poetic and literary bent, although there was an excellent sense of humor and naughtiness in all of it. Above, laser cut oil paint and below, photographs of ‘famous’ artist pants by Victoria Campillo. My favorite piece was The Rob Ryman, top left, wearing off-white pants. Hilarious.


Plywood Floors = Scope / Black Carpet = Art Asia. Got it? I liked the plywood. Flooring is important in setting a tone. Out of these two fairs, I definitely preferred the edginess of Scope and found Art Asia, with the exception of a couple of zingers, to fall flat.
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