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Scene Seen: Stephen Hendee at Silber Gallery

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Stephen Hendee: Void will be presented at Goucher College’s Silber Art Gallery in the Athenaeum from Tuesday, February 3 through Thursday, March 5, 2015. This exhibit, which is free and open to the public, can be viewed Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

This new large-scale installation was built by Stephen Hendee, best known for producing elaborate science-fiction-inspired, architecturally ambitious environments. These works often reference film and literary sources, and they are filled with flowing colors and illuminated crystalline entities.

All photos are by Alex Ebstein, taken at the opening reception on February 5. More information about the exhibit here.

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