Critical Review

Critical Review

The Perennial Dialogue Among Art Through the Ages at the Walters

The esteemed Baltimore institution shows pertinent new works among its coveted collection of ancient art to reveal eternal truths across world cultures – and that tricky thing called time.

Rapid Lemon Production at The Strand Theater Breaks Down the Fences

The Book of Grace opens with a familiar theme, the love-hate relationship between a domineering father and an aspiring son. By the end of the play that conflict has taken on world-shattering significance for both men.

An Exhibit of Diverse Objects that Collectively Attest to Deep Continuities and Extensive Cultural Exchanges.

While the Walters has been able to boast of one of the strongest collections of Ethiopian art in the world since the 1990s, the current exhibition offers a meaningful attempt to tell a complex and relational visual history in unprecedentedly detailed ways.

Eyewinkers, Tumbleturds, and Candlebugs Revisited:  A Legacy Unfolds at the Baltimore Museum of Art

A Vast Network of Creative Community is Revealed in the Enigmatic Artistry of Quilter Elizabeth Talford Scott

A Sort of Recap on Ann Patchett and R. Eric Thomas in conversation via the Ivy Bookshop

I feel an affinity for these flawed but well-intentioned characters, but I think Patchett’s gift for innovation comes from plot structure and how a story functions in reverberating and disparate layers.

The Acme Corporation Finds Salvation Among Community in their Newest Opera

"The Lights Went Out Because of a Problem," an opera created in Baltimore, is at the Voxel through December 17, 2023

Picks, Trends, and Observations from Fairs, Galleries, and the Rubell Museum (Including a Theory as to why Everything is Suddenly Periwinkle)

Is this a good year for galleries? That depends on who you ask. At the main fair, booths with challenging or innovative artworks are about as common as faces with intact buccal fat—they're few and far between and take some effort to spot.

An Interview with the Artist Ahead of her Screening and Exhibition Reception at Stevenson University

To say the work is political would be an understatement. To paraphrase her aunt at the opening: "Hey Heidi why don’t you tell us where you stand politically?" But it is more than that, it is about being an artist, being a mother, being a partner, and being a feminist in these ever so uncertain times

Elizabeth Myers Mitchell Museum Showcases Works From 1965-1980

The works in The Speed of Time show artists co-opting, even deconstructing film and video, media that, in their commercial form, were on their way to dominating the American consciousness.

National Gallery of Art to Screen Rarely Seen 1970s Films of Baltimore-Born Independent Black Filmmaker

The National Gallery of Art’s retrospective Skip Norman: Here and Now on December 9-10, 2023, is a long overdue homecoming for a talented Black filmmaker with strong connections to the region, whose small but compelling filmography and unique life story merit a fresh look.

Motor House's Exhibition Celebrating Baltimore's Puerto Rican Diaspora Closes 12/5

"Pa’ Mi Gente" is a love letter to the Puerto Rican diaspora in Baltimore and beyond.

Baltimore-Based Groups Participate in a Global Theater Festival to Inspire Action

Coinciding with the U.N. Climate Change Conference, Baltimore-based Plays and Readings

What is collaboration? And how do we know if it’s working?

Subscribers, Expect Your Copy of Issue 16: Collaboration this week!!

The Power and Prestige of European Women Creators from the 1400's-1800's

Collectively these pieces speak to our very human impulse towards making, documenting, and memorializing that extends beyond the early Modern era.

A Year Into Her Role as Successor to its Founding Director, AVAM Releases Jenenne Whitfield from her Contract

If an institution cannot successfully function without the direct engagement of its founding director, clearly it is not yet sustainable or ready to successfully onboard a successor.

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