Critical Review

Critical Review

A sleepy spy movie that turns into a slow-burn romance and then a tragic catharsis

What looks like a staid costume drama is more like if Chantal Ackerman got ahold of a Merchant-Ivory movie.

Designs for Different Futures, the special exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, considers a range of changes to come

What choices do we have now and what future will we end up with? 

Hyper-local Ghost Story Explores History's Tensions with the Present

Who are these people? What is their relationship? Why is it so damn awkward? It's an engaging hook for the audience that fits nicely with the farcical Clue-inspired supernatural whodunnit that follows in the second half of the one-act play. 

Lola Pierson's opera, with music by Horse Lords, finds humor in incomprehension

Lola Pierson, who wrote the text and directed the show, frequently had the audience laughing—often at the very confusion that opera (and language) might perpetuate.

Martin's mixed media works present the strength of spiritual ancestors and place questions about beauty and race into daily consciousness

Walking through Delita Martin's solo exhibition, Calling Down The Spirits, felt like I was flipping through my grandmother’s photo albums, seeing intimate details of people that I could never know: a turn of the neck, an upward cast of an eye.

A remarkable depth is on clear display in this small but potent exhibition at The Walters

You don’t have to be a connoisseur or a Catholic to enjoy this medieval relic.

At Hamilton Gallery, meditative psychedelic soul-searching with an Xbox controller

If 1917, a video game, is a movie, then Oldenburg's video games, sitting in the back room of the Hamilton Gallery, are movies.

The deeply personal educational documentary explores the origins of an African fabric.

Obinyan ostensibly frames Wax Print around asking the question, “Is wax print African?” It’s a question that is both impossible to answer and has a pretty obvious answer: Yes. You have likely seen wax print and, just as likely, somebody ripping off its style.

'Pop' Turns Valerie Solanas' 1968 Shooting of Andy Warhol into an Agatha Christie-ish Whodunnit

The 2009 musical, with book/lyrics by Maggie-Kate Coleman and music by Anna K. Jacobs, is ahistorical, apolitical, amodern, and absolutely entertaining.

Semi-fictional new wave movie ambles around with Jean-Michel Basquiat and Merce Cunningham's challenging choreography—in 3D!

Downtown 81, a somewhat fictional, hang-out movie starring Jean-Michel Basquiat and Alla Kovgan's assiduous documentary, Cunningham, screening in Baltimore

Elizabeth Catlett: Artist as Activist at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum

Field workers, sharecroppers, mothers, grandmothers (and occasionally fathers too) share space in her oeuvre with abolitionists and civil rights icons, everyone with dirt under their fingernails, everyone in all of their ordinary glory.

Tragicomedy seems a fitting genre for a show about witchcraft, for what is more magical than being more than one thing at once?

As Budenz makes clear at the beginning of the show, there has always been some version of a fuckboy, always someone trying to slide into your DMs.

Fleishman Is in Trouble, Three Women, and Queenie

If there are any men who want to understand the way a woman’s mind and body works, kindly add these three books to your list.

Best Baltimore Exhibits, Projects, and Experiments 2010-2019

Baltimore’s pool of talent is an ever-expanding universe.

This week: Larry Cook's Eternal Splendor at Galerie Myrtis, Expanded Dialogue at Guest Spot at the Reinstitute and MONOPractice, and C – Magnetic Cultures: Four Chinese Artists at Cardinal.

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