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Chasing Tales at Project 4

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Bill Schmidt at Hillyer Art Space

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Chasing Tales features eight different artists who discuss how myths, narratives and fantasies have shaped Western Culture. Religion, literature, games, entertainment and societal myths are among the concepts explored through media, including photography, video and traditional painting techniques. Each artist’s work reflects both an individual perspective of the artist’s place within his or her narrative and a shared cultural experience. In exploring the history from which they derive, these artists are presenting historical narratives under a new lens.

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Painters Nancy Baker, Raymond Uhlir and Anthony Pontius use traditional models of pictorial representation as a departure point, and then incorporate contemporary characters and events in order to depict either cynicism, confusion or amusement with our culture. Photographer Kim Keever uses a traditional model of pictorial representation as a jumping off point as well, but mocks the grandness of the sublime American landscape and its ideals by imitating its space with a fish-tank in his apartment filled with kitsch terrarium novelties and dyes. “The Septemberists” by Anthony Goicolea is a romantic and moody video which elegantly narrates the struggles and awkwardness of adolescent boyhood in our culture, a theme that Goicolea commonly employs.The intersection of escapism and reality can be seen in all of the works shown; with these juxtapositions new tales and trajectories result. www.project4gallery.com

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