Film

Film

The documentary is inspired by both Baltimore and Vienna and it traverses both with the director’s own personal perspective

Director Bernadette Wegenstein, a filmmaker and professor of media studies at Johns Hopkins University, met Alsop in Baltimore City, where they both live and work.

Both Baltimore documentaries are part of this year's Maryland Film Festival lineup

A close read of two films screening at the 2021 MdFF.

The 2021 festival is mostly virtual, with genre-bending offerings that work as well in the digital world as they do on the big screen

This eclectic approach to audience cultivation speaks to the fact that the Parkway’s core audience is a blend of multi-hyphenates: Cinephiles and filmmakers, arts administrators, college students, and anyone drawn to the Station North arts scene.

A poetic consideration of a video piece that captures the dazzling mundanity of the everyday

Barber's 2017 video piece “3 Peonies,” featured in the BMA’s virtual Screening Room, is like watching a dream play out, feeling both familiar and surreal.

'The Right Girls' follows young transgender women trying to cross the US border, but falls victim to many typical vérité pitfalls

Without trans persons behind the camera, the spectacle of The Right Girls offers few answers for those of us with a personal stake in the outcome of this journey. 

Bombarded by all of this awful surreality, you might start to think that everything out there could very well be cake

It's like reality is bending.

Reboot removes the original's hammy atmospherics, keeps the police-procedural worship and vigilantism

   

Jerry Lewis Gone ACAB and Howardena Pindell’s Free, White and 21

Two movies that make sense right now amid endless terror-scrolling Twitter.

Ali is a fluid performance and music artist, cultural worker, and organizer

Abdu Ali's nomadic curatorial platform as they lay includes sound and performance art, poetry, and more.

Podcasts may have messed with filmmaking a little bit

With all of us ostensibly inside, talking less or at least talking to less people, the appeal of hearing voices that aren’t our own for extended periods of time has taken on a certain restorative luster.

What industry disruptions mean for independent filmmakers in Baltimore

COVID cancellations don’t just deprive filmmakers of a chance to show their movies to audiences, but it’s at festivals where movies end up being purchased for distribution.

Programmed like a TV channel, Cinephobe is guided by a passionate, discerning, and decidedly inclusive approach to movies

“We’re a small group of film enthusiasts with a sense of humor and a low tolerance for stupidity,” The Cinephobe told BmoreArt.

Not journalistic filmmaking exactly, but it isn’t hagiography either

This meandering documentary uses the 1997-1998 Chicago Bulls season (the last one with Jordan and, therefore, the last time the Jordan-led team won big) as scaffolding for a larger story about Michael Jordan and basketball.

Curated and programmed like a TV channel, QuaranTV showcases arthouse features, YouTube compilations, cartoons and more

With set times for morning cartoons and kid stuff, lots of movies, live musical performances, and original programming, there’s a mixtape quality to QuaranTV.

Director/writer Eliza Hittman's new film Never Rarely Sometimes Always 

Never Rarely Sometimes Always is something of a procedural, except the procedure here isn’t a police investigation or anything along those lines, it’s an abortion.

1 2 3 4 7