Visual Art

Visual Art

New development in Station North making longtime residents and artists concerned about displacement and instability

Is there a way to bring much-needed investment to Greenmount West without displacing the artists?

Monaghan’s themes of power, technology, and rampant consumerism speak to the unique challenges of today’s attention economy

The wolves feel like stand-ins for Americans, full of desire for the traditional trappings of empire while simultaneously feeling empty and repulsed by the barren world that surrounds us.

In this collection of work, Munroe focuses on his relationship to Black single fatherhood, a multidimensional and intimate subject

The scenes are distorted and dreamlike, and Munroe knows just when to stop and let the material do the work.

Through performance and wearable sculpture, Corona examines themes such as othering, fear of death, white supremacy, and the climate crisis

Each piece selected and displayed within the walls of the Walters—an institution with its own admitted history of othering and white supremacy—reveals the evolution of an artistic practice by a multidimensional creator making multidimensional work.

An artist who combines sculpture, fiber art, and performance into rituals designed to venerate and heal

Tsedaye Makonnen focuses her work in particular on people migrating from Africa across the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, historically and in the present day, drawing parallels between the two.

An artist forcing us to ask not only “What is this?” but the much more unnervingly delicious, “When is this?”

Sohn uses commercial ceramics techniques overwhelmingly used to create uniform multiple objects, and experiments with the process at various stages to create unique objects that can’t be mass reproduced

A week of reviews of each of the five Sondheim finalists and their exhibits at the Walters

This week we will publish individual reviews of Hae Won Sohn, Tsedaye Makonnen, Hoesy Corona, Lavar Munroe, and Jonathan Monaghan

The sculptor talks about moving to Baltimore during the pandemic, thinking with your hands, and singing to your plants

Lucien’s work is an investigation of how everyday materials can function as metaphors recalling an absence or intimacy of the human body

An interview with Sonya Clark about her survey show at NMWA

Taking over an entire floor of the museum, the show is a massive undertaking that showcases 100 works in a survey spanning Clark’s career.

A conversation with the Dallas-based artist after his first series of shows on the East Coast in the Spring of 2021

A rebellious artist exploring his location and position through his necessary work, David-Jeremiah invites viewers to name their relationship to his America and their America as well. 

How the sculptor selects materials, why Baltimore is her 'Bermuda Triangle,' and what goes into the hour-long pandemic salad

Adapting and problem solving excite Maghazehe and motivate her materially centered sculpture practice.

Bradford’s Mother Paintings feel like deep breaths exhaled into a changed world

The figures populating the Mother Paintings live among slabs of heavy, humid air, hypersensitized in their responses to claustrophobic and caustic atmospheres.

His murals dot Baltimore City and are immediately recognizable for their realism, sense of color, and strong, often political narratives

"Our abilities are not proprietary and should not be hoarded. If someone needs assistance producing a mural, I try to make myself available."

Moyer's solo exhibition Analog Time at Chelsea's DC Moore Gallery presents new works on canvas and paper

Moyer’s calm demeanor that has weathered the art world and beyond gave me solace during a time when having a studio practice can feel monumental and frivolous all at once.

A conceptually crisp and sharp critique of American xenophobia and racism

The stock icon has yielded to something darker and more ominous.

1 2 3 4 68