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Baltimore ’68 Riots: Loss and Legacy at MICA April 7

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Dan Corrigan and Kevin Smith at Gallery 1448 April 3

After the news of Martin Luther King’s death (April, 1968) became public, riots broke out in cities all over the country, including Baltimore. Last year, in collaboration with the University of Baltimore’s year-long series of events, entitled “Baltimore ’68: Riots and Rebirth,” the local literary journal, Passager, published a collection of oral histories by public officials, television reporters, clergy, storeowners, national guardsmen, and ordinary people of all ages. One of the surprising aspects of collecting the stories was learning that little had been written about the riots and very few people who lived through them had even talked about them with their families.

In commemorating Dr. King, MICA joins with Passager and the University of Baltimore to present a dramatic reading, followed by a conversation with the audience, of the some of the stories collected in the “Baltimore ’68: Riots and Rebirth” project.

“It was like the world was ending.” Lillie Hyman, High School Senior

“…we didn’t want to call it a riot because we didn’t know what a riot was.” Thomas Donellan, Roman Catholic Priest

“..things began to spread into West Baltimore. That’s when I called Governor Agnew and asked for federal troops.” Thomas D’Alesandro III Mayor

“…And the teachers would say, “People just don’t know what to do.” Juanita Crider, Child in East Baltimore

Event April 7, Brown Center, Falvey Hall at 7:30 p.m.

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