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MICA Grad Show I

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It is springtime, which means it is graduate exhibition season at MICA. Each year MICA hosts a series of exhibitions ubiquitously titled Grad Show I–V along with numerous other presentations, public programs, and student-curated installations to introduce graduate thesis work to the public. The first in the series of Grad Shows, Grad Show I, features work by students in the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program and was curated by Tru Ludwig, an adjunct faculty member and student advisor at MICA.

I’m always interested to see what MAT students make, as their program is not based on a studio practice. Unsurprisingly, students mentioned education or learning in their artists’ statements and overwhelmingly focused on art as a tool, not an object. Even with a similar pedagogical approach to artmaking, the work itself was quite varied, offering something for everyone.  

Violette Liu, Where the Current Takes me

Monique Johnson, Undercurrents

Sara ReinhardtSeeing Through You

Claire Popovich, Asphalt Wandering 

Maria Victa, Kitchen Portraiture 

Emma Chin, The Anagama Experience

Christina Rinker, Bananas

Claudia Ennis, Coping

 

Aura Evans, Habitable Habiliment 

Korey Rosenbaum, places, spaces, faces, and other scraps found along the way

Courtney PayneMonsters and Friends 

Jet Orsi, Misperceptions

Taylor McManus, Bloom

Amy Horrigan, Absorbing Color

Rebecca Oh, Learning Garden

Sydney Lussier, Concealed Duality

Joyce Lin

 

Grad Show I will be up through March 11th at MICA’s Lazarus IV Center. Click here more information about the exhibition and the other Shows.

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