Artworld Global

Artworld Global

A Book for Art Nerds and Aficionados, as well as the Culturally Curious

Get the Picture: Bianca Bosker’s Journey Among Inspired Artists and Obsessive Art Fiends Who Taught Her How to See (February 2024 Viking)

National Pavilions Question their own Identities in a Globalized World

At the national pavilions there’s an appropriately diverse set of strategies for addressing the legacies of colonialism and immigration from both traumatic or optimistic perspectives. 

Curator Adriano Pedrosa Celebrates Acts of Resistance, Independence, Vulnerability, and Joy in Spite of a Sick, Sad World

The 60th Venice Biennale takes on themes of displacement, environmental injustice, racism, colonialism, but also manages to avoid easy cliches by treating artists from marginalized backgrounds as individuals with agency.

Confusing Institutional Acquisitions, Big Paintings of Butts, and Heaps (Literally) of Ceramics

A Roundup of Madrid Art Fairs, including ARCO and its numerous satellite fairs, which close on Sunday, March 10

Highlights, Zeitgeists, and Weirdness (Including Shows You Can Still See)

There is no other “must-see” event on the ever-more-esoteric Aztec calendar of art world “can’t miss” events that fills me with as much eager anticipation and simultaneous existential dread.  But the art here makes it all worth it. 

Art Fairs, Openings, Performances, and Travel Advice from an Almost-Chilango

This year, I’m sharing my art week event picks—based on expertise gleaned spending the better part of the past decade always searching for some elusive superlative in the capital of extremes. 

Picks, Trends, and Observations from Fairs, Galleries, and the Rubell Museum (Including a Theory as to why Everything is Suddenly Periwinkle)

Is this a good year for galleries? That depends on who you ask. At the main fair, booths with challenging or innovative artworks are about as common as faces with intact buccal fat—they're few and far between and take some effort to spot.

The New Museu de l’Art Prohibit in Barcelona is a Refuge for Censored Artworks

The Museu de l’Art Prohibit is, according to its founders, the first of its kind: a museum dedicated to the collection, preservation, and display of art that has been censored (in one way or another) elsewhere. Its contents are equal-opportunity offenders—having already outraged every religion.

In "Pope of Trash" Cinema's Enfant Terrible Gets Cannonically Crowned by the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, Los Angeles

Actress (on strike) and writer (no longer on strike!) Liz Eldridge on why John Waters' mainstream acceptance restores her faith in filmmaking.

Highlights from the Fair, and Why We Should be Taking Notes

I so wish more art spaces from the Baltimore/DC region participated in smart, well-curated smaller fairs like this—putting local artists in dialogue with international peers and in front of international audiences and kingmakers.

A Homecoming to Puerto Rico Offers the Chance to Check-in on the Island's Cultural Institutions

Visits to two museums in San Juan: the Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico and the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico

Frieze's Move to Hudson Yards isn't Just a Faux Pas—It's Lending Cultural Cachet to the Right Wing

Who is behind this genius work of boundary-busting relational aesthetics? That would be Related Companies, a real estate behemoth that controls a staggering $60 billion worth of property and was founded by former tax attorney Stephen Ross, a friend and fundraiser to Donald Trump.

An Uneven Edition Demonstrates New Models of Financial Sustainability, but also the Necessity of Curators

Never have I ever felt more like Thora Birch’s character in "Ghost World" rolling her eyes in mandatory summer school art class than in gallery number 3...

Collaboration Between Institutional, DIY, Public, and Private Art Entities Makes for a Great Art Week

Madrid's flagship fair ARCO—as well as its satellites JUSTMAD, Art Madrid, UVNT, and Hybrid—seem to have firmly cemented their place on the circuit, even if competitors in North America sometimes get more attention.

This Iteration of the Genre-Bending Berlin Institution Considers Scale with Alternating Humor, Gravity, and Weirdness

The artworks on display might all be defined as technologically speculative but ran a range from past and present critiques to future possibilities (the term speculative comes up all too regularly in such spheres). Techno-utopianisms were not the theme here...

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