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Sight Specific: Rachel Sitkin Marks and Erin Treacy at Plywood Gallery by Cara Ober

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After lunch at Atwaters Belvedere Square, I wandered into the Sunday Brunch opening reception for the new exhibit at Plywood, Sight Specific. Plywood is a temporary, roving gallery, currently operating out of a storefront in the popular shopping village.

Sight Specific is an exhibit of paintings by Rachel Sitkin and Erin Treacy, who both relate their visual practices with their travels to exotic locations. In the exhibit, both artists explore the ways each is  inspired by the landscapes of specific locations, although Sitkin approaches the subject from a topographic, socio-economic perspective and Treacy uses it as a springboard into textural abstractions which employ multiple perspectives.

Erin Treacy
Rachel Sitkin and Erin Treacy

Although the opening reception was today, and this is Plywood’s last exhibit in this space, there are a few special events to look forward to:
Special event hours (Film Screening- Free) Friday, February 24, 2012 8:00-10:00pm
Plywood is also open by appointment or stop in at Grand Cru. More info at: www.plywoodsite.org

Plywood
511 E. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore, MD 21212

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