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Shifting Light: An Interview with Carol Miller Frost by Joan Cox

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Exploring the luminosity, ambiguity, and relativity of space, Carol Frost’s “Shifting Light” is a body of abstract paintings that explore the physical presence of light. Painting in a reductive manner by limiting her palette to monochromatic color schemes, Frost plays with ideas of optical illusion and spatial ambiguity with layers of hard-edged and dissolving planes of color. At first glance, there is a disarming simplicity to the work, however further investigation reveals a complex pictorial space that can be disorienting, as well as provocative in its negotiation between simultaneous expressionism and reductivism, emotion and intellect.

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Frost has exhibited extensively throughout the Mid-Atlantic region and at a national level at institutions such as the McClean Project for the Arts (McClean, VA), the Delaware Art Museum (Wilmington, DE), and the Kennedy Museum of Art (Athens, OH). Her work belongs in numerous public and corporate collections including the Baltimore Museum of Art (Baltimore, MD), the Musée Cheateau de Rochefort (Rochefort-en-Terre, France), and the Univeristy of Richmond Museum (Richmond, VA). This exhibition will be up through December 31, 2014.

Joan Cox met Frost at C. Grimaldis Gallery to walk through the exhibition and discuss her new work. Their conversation is as follows.

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Author Joan Cox is a Baltimore based artist.

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