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Art Walk 2017: Top 20

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2017 MICA Commencement Exhibition: Art Walk 2017 Top 20 by Amy Boone-McCreesh

This year’s Art Walk was the tenth of its kind, marking the end of another year at MICA. The commencement exhibition was held in nearly every building on campus from 5-10pm on the evening of May 11. To see all the work visitors really needed the entire five hours!

Below are my top twenty picks (in no particular order) of interesting work and promising artists across a wide range of programs. You can still see the work on campus until Tuesday, May 15,2017.

  1. Kat Kennedy
  2. Cindy Perdomo, Fibers
  3. Michael Ward-Rosenbaum, Painting
  4. Emily Lynn Schultz, Painting
  5. Anna Silina, Painting
  6. Andrew Flanders, Interdisciplinary Sculpture
  7. Gabrielle Velez, Fibers Major
  8. Courtney Wynn Cooper
  9. Richard McDonough
  10. Trisha Cheeney
  11. Camille Canell, Fibers
  12. Korey Rosenbaum, Interdisciplinary sculpture
  13. Stephen Kistner, Graphic Design
  14. Sierra Ho, Sculpture
  15. Alli Woodhouse, GFA
  16. Alexa Meng, Fibers
  17. Madeline McConnell, Fibers
  18. JaeJoon Jang
  19. Julia Memoli, GFA
  20. Sophie Friedman Pappas and Vincent Castro, Painting
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