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Moving Walls at The Peale

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Party Photos from Issue 05 Magazine Release

A Photo Essay by Zachary Z. Handler

Moving Walls is a site specific performance featuring Noa Heyne, Sidney Pink, Sarah Smith, Matthew Williams, and Khristian Weeks at The Peale Center in downtown Baltimore that occurred in four sessions between April 28 and May 5.

Moving Walls is an experimental dance piece that examines human experience in relation to architecture. Combining movement with sculpture, animation, and sound, the piece is a collaborative project that questions our concepts of stability. With wheels, ropes, pulleys, hooks, and hinges, three performers construct and deconstruct the space around them. In turn, they are influenced by their shifting surroundings.

During its run, audience members were invited to explore their own unique perspectives of Moving Walls by passing freely throughout different rooms of The Peale Center. The Peale’s rich and complex history of preservation, including former exhibitions on taxidermy and the building’s own physical restoration, provides a visual and conceptual framework for the performance.

Outside the performances, Moving Walls was open to the public as an art installation, April 14th- May 5th.

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