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Madeline Keesing and Carrie Seid at Goya Friday, January 15

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Opening Reception Friday, January 15, 2010, 6:00-8:00 pm

Madeleine Keesing
Rhapsody (Diptych ) /oil on canvas / 72 × 72 inches

Carrie Seid
Bubble Study #2 / steel, mylar, and silk / 8 × 16 × 1.25 inches

Exhibition Dates: January 15, 2010 – March 30, 2010

Goya Contemporary . Goya-Girl Press
3000 Chestnut Avenue . Suite 214
Baltimore , MD 21211
P. 410-366-2001 F. 410-235-8730
www.goyacontemporary.com
For more information contact:
Amy Raehse, Executive Director, [email protected]

Madeleine Keesing: by Dr. Julia Bernard, Berlin / Washington

Fabric of Life: While the production of Madeleine Keesing’s art has been compared to the processes of cuisine or the weaving of tapestries, there is no question that, despite their visual abstraction, the impact of these images depends upon connections with elements of the outside world – metaphorically suggested as well as more literally referenced by their structure. This is important because, above all, these paintings seem to be about the nature of experience, a world-view or an attitude: one that emphasizes immersion and participation in the world around us, embedded in everyday life in a fashion akin to the philosopher John Dewey’s approach to art (cf. Art as Experience, 1934).

Aesthetic Meditation: Despite the centrality of such real-world embeddedness, Keesing’s works also conversely prompt an engagement in aesthetic meditation. This is not only because of their abstraction and contrapuntal juxtaposition of layered colors, nor the suggestion of sea or landscape. It is because of the somewhat-painstaking, even compulsive procedure of their construction via gradual buildup of uneven rows of paint droplets. This process of execution implicitly involves the viewer in that his or her response is crucial to completing the “circle of production.”

Post-Minimalism: Art historically speaking, Keesing’s paintings, drawings, prints, and sculpture share a tendency or thread in contemporary artistic production known as Post-Minimalism. The concern with saturated color, undermining of monochromaticism, subtle complexities of multi-chromatic inter-relations, and visual “depth,” place the works firmly within the realm of Post-Minimalist practice. By way of their association with traditionally female media such as cooking, quilting, or weaving, in addition to the historical precedent of feminist-oriented Pattern Painting, these works run parallel to Post-Minimalism’s emphasis on a human element, in contrast to the machine or custom made works of minimalism.
Color-Field: With respect to the “native” geographic or socio-cultural context for this pictorial approach, Washington DC as a mise-en-scene obviously plays an important role. This is true given both the tradition of Washington Color Field painting of the 1960s-70s, and the physical nature of that city: with its large-scale ceremonial spaces, geometrically planned as well as bathed in a particular kind of (if not quite Parisian) silvery light. Additionally, the atmosphere is unpolluted by industrial production due to a largely bureaucratic white-collar service-industry economy. DC is a “power center,” where the numerous public art collections are a significant aspect of a setting that encourages artists’ to be aware of the visual-historical traditions within which they operate.
Dr. Julia Bernard is a trained art historian with a PhD from the University of Chicago . Having taught and published both in Germany and the US , her academic fields of specialization include Modern and Contemporary art in Europe and the United States , and the special relationship between the avant-gardes in both countries since WWII.

“Keesing is a painter of abstract pictures, whose paintings must always read as paintings, even as they insist on their relationship to and continuity with historically female-identified handicraft. Neither simply decorative, as is much art produced after facile interpretations of the criticism of Clement Greenberg and his descendants, nor the kitsch pastiche practice to which the pattern and decoration movement devolved after Miriam Schapiro’s initial pointed gesture, Keesing’s mature work should be understood as the materialization of a thoughtful and unique reconciliation of high formalist-modernist values and important feminist social-critical impulses suppressed in late modernism.” Thom Collins, director, Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York

www.goyacontemporary.com
Amy Eva Raehse
Executive Director
Goya Contemporary & Goya-Girl Press
3000 Chestnut Avenue, Mill #214
Baltimore, MD 21211
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.goyacontemporary.com

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New fiber art exhibition at the Renwick, The Phillips Collection 2024-25 exhibition schedule, BMA announces environmental initiatives, Charles Mason III, Preakness future, Everyman Theatre's "Midsummer," FPCT's upcoming season, Golden West, and MICA - News from local and independent media sources.

Preakness Photos by E. Brady Robinson

Along with weird horse names and laying a bet, the fashion at Preakness and other Triple Crown races is oddly traditional, a pageant of who's who in pastel suits, bowties, fancy hats, and floral dresses.

The best weekly art openings, events, and calls for entry happening in Baltimore and surrounding areas.

This Week:  Jerrell Gibbs at James Cohan NYC, artists reception + awards presentation for UMBC's 2024 Visual Arts Senior Exhibition, The Black Artist Fair's Grantwriting Basics – The Black AF Edition, Open Critique w/ Schroeder Cherry at Creative Alliance, Arvay Adams opening reception and more!

A Conversation with the Painter on the Pleasure of Process, Invigorating the Ordinary, and Etheric Bodies

For Chabwera, painting is an opportunity to turn inwards and reflect on the mind, body, and self. She then gradually externalizes those reflections through a singular piece or series.

Reading

Madeline Keesing and Carrie Seid at Goya Friday, January 15

Previous Story

Solar Prints and Encaustic Workshop with Soledad [...]

Next Story

Photos from Glittering Generalities at RSG, Brook [...]

Opening Reception Friday, January 15, 2010, 6:00-8:00 pm

Madeleine Keesing
Rhapsody (Diptych ) /oil on canvas / 72 × 72 inches

Carrie Seid
Bubble Study #2 / steel, mylar, and silk / 8 × 16 × 1.25 inches

Exhibition Dates: January 15, 2010 – March 30, 2010

Goya Contemporary . Goya-Girl Press
3000 Chestnut Avenue . Suite 214
Baltimore , MD 21211
P. 410-366-2001 F. 410-235-8730
www.goyacontemporary.com
For more information contact:
Amy Raehse, Executive Director, [email protected]

Madeleine Keesing: by Dr. Julia Bernard, Berlin / Washington

Fabric of Life: While the production of Madeleine Keesing’s art has been compared to the processes of cuisine or the weaving of tapestries, there is no question that, despite their visual abstraction, the impact of these images depends upon connections with elements of the outside world – metaphorically suggested as well as more literally referenced by their structure. This is important because, above all, these paintings seem to be about the nature of experience, a world-view or an attitude: one that emphasizes immersion and participation in the world around us, embedded in everyday life in a fashion akin to the philosopher John Dewey’s approach to art (cf. Art as Experience, 1934).

Aesthetic Meditation: Despite the centrality of such real-world embeddedness, Keesing’s works also conversely prompt an engagement in aesthetic meditation. This is not only because of their abstraction and contrapuntal juxtaposition of layered colors, nor the suggestion of sea or landscape. It is because of the somewhat-painstaking, even compulsive procedure of their construction via gradual buildup of uneven rows of paint droplets. This process of execution implicitly involves the viewer in that his or her response is crucial to completing the “circle of production.”

Post-Minimalism: Art historically speaking, Keesing’s paintings, drawings, prints, and sculpture share a tendency or thread in contemporary artistic production known as Post-Minimalism. The concern with saturated color, undermining of monochromaticism, subtle complexities of multi-chromatic inter-relations, and visual “depth,” place the works firmly within the realm of Post-Minimalist practice. By way of their association with traditionally female media such as cooking, quilting, or weaving, in addition to the historical precedent of feminist-oriented Pattern Painting, these works run parallel to Post-Minimalism’s emphasis on a human element, in contrast to the machine or custom made works of minimalism.
Color-Field: With respect to the “native” geographic or socio-cultural context for this pictorial approach, Washington DC as a mise-en-scene obviously plays an important role. This is true given both the tradition of Washington Color Field painting of the 1960s-70s, and the physical nature of that city: with its large-scale ceremonial spaces, geometrically planned as well as bathed in a particular kind of (if not quite Parisian) silvery light. Additionally, the atmosphere is unpolluted by industrial production due to a largely bureaucratic white-collar service-industry economy. DC is a “power center,” where the numerous public art collections are a significant aspect of a setting that encourages artists’ to be aware of the visual-historical traditions within which they operate.
Dr. Julia Bernard is a trained art historian with a PhD from the University of Chicago . Having taught and published both in Germany and the US , her academic fields of specialization include Modern and Contemporary art in Europe and the United States , and the special relationship between the avant-gardes in both countries since WWII.

“Keesing is a painter of abstract pictures, whose paintings must always read as paintings, even as they insist on their relationship to and continuity with historically female-identified handicraft. Neither simply decorative, as is much art produced after facile interpretations of the criticism of Clement Greenberg and his descendants, nor the kitsch pastiche practice to which the pattern and decoration movement devolved after Miriam Schapiro’s initial pointed gesture, Keesing’s mature work should be understood as the materialization of a thoughtful and unique reconciliation of high formalist-modernist values and important feminist social-critical impulses suppressed in late modernism.” Thom Collins, director, Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York

www.goyacontemporary.com
Amy Eva Raehse
Executive Director
Goya Contemporary & Goya-Girl Press
3000 Chestnut Avenue, Mill #214
Baltimore, MD 21211
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.goyacontemporary.com

Related Stories
Baltimore art news updates from independent & regional media

New fiber art exhibition at the Renwick, The Phillips Collection 2024-25 exhibition schedule, BMA announces environmental initiatives, Charles Mason III, Preakness future, Everyman Theatre's "Midsummer," FPCT's upcoming season, Golden West, and MICA - News from local and independent media sources.

Preakness Photos by E. Brady Robinson

Along with weird horse names and laying a bet, the fashion at Preakness and other Triple Crown races is oddly traditional, a pageant of who's who in pastel suits, bowties, fancy hats, and floral dresses.

The best weekly art openings, events, and calls for entry happening in Baltimore and surrounding areas.

This Week:  Jerrell Gibbs at James Cohan NYC, artists reception + awards presentation for UMBC's 2024 Visual Arts Senior Exhibition, The Black Artist Fair's Grantwriting Basics – The Black AF Edition, Open Critique w/ Schroeder Cherry at Creative Alliance, Arvay Adams opening reception and more!

A Conversation with the Painter on the Pleasure of Process, Invigorating the Ordinary, and Etheric Bodies

For Chabwera, painting is an opportunity to turn inwards and reflect on the mind, body, and self. She then gradually externalizes those reflections through a singular piece or series.