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Tara Rodgers: Patterns of Movement Closing Reception Friday, August 24 at The Stamp Gallery

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TARA RODGERS Patterns of Movement: Data and Sound Works, 2005-12 
at the Stamp Gallery, UMCP 
Closing Reception: Friday, August 24, 5-8PM 

Since 2005, Tara Rodgers has worked with the open-source programming language SuperCollider (www.audiosynth.com) to explore relationships among data, sounds, subjective experiences, and large-scale patterns of living systems. She also works with translations between sound, photography, and video, where the parameters of one medium shape those of another.

This exhibition collects a series of sound and intermedia projects created over the last seven years with similar methods and themes. Many of these pieces employ data sonification techniques (conversions of data from diverse sources into sound) and generative compositional structures (open-ended in form and/or duration). In representations of landscapes, weather events, and migration flows, Rodgers uses digital sounds metaphorically and poetically: to blur distinctions between what is heard as natural or artificial, and to reference the dynamism and ephemerality of environments and forms of life.

http://stampgallery.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/tara-rodgers-patterns-of-movement-pre-show-interview-13/ 

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