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Bmoreart’s Picks: Baltimore Art Events and Openings May 22-26

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This weekend, catch JM Giordano’s Killer Angels at the Windup Space on Wednesday, May 22 and two solo shows at Grimaldis Gallery on Thursday. Then, on Saturday, don’t miss the Panel Discussion: New York Centrality and the Artist’s Practice from 2-4 pm at The Reinstitute. Saturday night, there’s the reception for Rodolphe Delaunay: “Of the Attraction of the Sun” at Current from 7-10 pm, presented by ICA Baltimore.

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Killer Angels: Faces of Death Metal Opening Reception feat. Coffin Dust and Part Death
Wednesday, May 22 @ The Windup Space

Fresh from his first New York show, the Windup Space will host a reception for J.M. Giordano’s portrait project Killer Angels: Faces of American Death Metal. Inspired by the work of the late Richard Avedon, Giordano’s almost life sized portraits are 30’x40′.
Angels began as an assignment for City Paper and now being published in book for by Low Side Press in 2014.

After the reception, stay for a special concert by two premier Death/Black Metal bands: Part Death and COFFIN DUST of Philly. Prepare to have your ears bled!

Reception: 6-8:30
Bands: 8:30-?
Cover: Free until 8:30. $5 after!
21+ after 8.

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Two Opening Receptions at Grimaldis Gallery Thursday, May 23 from 6 – 8 p.m.
Alexey Titarenko: Venice and Dennis Lee Mitchell: Smoke Drawings

On view May 23 – July 6, 2013

www.cgrimaldisgallery.com

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Centrality-Poster

Panel Discussion: New York Centrality and the Artist’s Practice
Saturday May 25, 2013 2pm-4pm
THE REINSTITUTE
1715 North Calvert St. Baltimore, MD.

In collaboration with Guest Spot’s current exhibition Same Same But Different, THE REINSTITUTE is hosting a community and panel discussion on New York Centrality and the Artist’s Practice. The program is inspired by recent related articles that depict New York City as not a place for young artists – Vulture: Saltz on the Death of the Gallery Show; and The L Magazine: Don’t Move to New York. The discussion will spark a critical conversation about the exchange and transformation of the artist’s practice in New York and the current challenges that artists face while living in the City. The panelists include three recent MFA graduates from Hunter College (New York City): Jay Gaskill, Fabibian G. Tabibian, and Amanda Valdez; the talk will be moderated by the Director of The Reinstitute, Rod Malin.

“I’m sad that New York, the city I’ve lived in for more than 10 years, is now barely hospitable to those making the kind of art I love.” Paddy Johnson

“Art doesn’t have to be shown in New York to be validated.” Jerry Saltz

Same Same but Different is an exhibition collective formed by three Brooklyn-based artists (Jay Gaskill, Fabian G. Tabibian, and Amanda Valdez). They do not share a studio nor do they make works together. Their collaboration supersedes the physical space of the studio; it exists ephemerally in conversation, in actions, and in shared thinking. The collective’s physical manifestation is in the exhibition space as a site-specific opportunity in which the three artists’ work is brought together to create new meaning and propositions. The phrase “Same Same but Different” represents the nexus at which their work converges and diverges from each other.

The discussion will mark the closing of Same Same But Different on Saturday May 25, 2013.

Same Same but Different is the third in an ongoing series of eponymous exhibitions organized by the collective of the same name. The infamous Southeast Asian colloquialism is used as both descriptor for their collaboration and inspiration for their exhibitions. Formed in 2012 in Brooklyn, they have previously mounted exhibitions in New York City and Seattle. Each exhibition is site-specific but remains rooted in the core concept of their collaboration, which is their common formal language of purposeful colors and simple shapes in complex arrangements. The phrase “same same but different” is elastic and is used by merchants to describe a wide array of wares. They have embraced its full meaning by using these exhibitions as an opportunity to showcase multifarious sides of their practices, thereby enabling different combinations of their work to produce new meanings and connections. For the show with Guest Spot @ THE REINSTITUTE, they have taken very literal inspiration from the gallery by expanding the scope of their collaboration by inviting two guest artists to join them in the exhibition space.

Jay Gaskill – Halsey Hathaway – Maya Hayuk – Fabian G. Tabibian – Amanda Valdez

Same Same but Different is an exhibition collective formed by three Brooklyn-based artists (Jay Gaskill, Fabian G. Tabibian, and Amanda Valdez). They do not share a studio nor do they make works together. Their collaboration supersedes the physical space of the studio; it exists ephemerally in conversation, in actions, and in shared thinking. The collective’s physical manifestation is in the exhibition space as a site-specific opportunity in which the three artists’ work is brought together to create new meaning and propositions. The phrase “Same Same but Different” represents the nexus at which their work converges and diverges from each other.

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Rodolphe Delaunay: “Of the Attraction of the Sun”
Presented by ICA Baltimore @ Current Gallery
421 North Howard St, Baltimore, MD

Opening Reception: Saturday, May 25th, 7-10pm
May 25 to June 16, 2013

ICA Baltimore is pleased to announce OF THE ATTRACTION OF THE SUN, by Rodolphe Delaunay. Rodolphe Delaunay is a French artist, born in 1984, and temporarily based in Baltimore. He graduated from Paris’s École des Beaux Arts in 2008. Since then he has participated in several group shows in Italy, Indonesia and France and has had solo shows in Paris at Galerie Frédéric Lacroix and The Window 41.

Delaunay’s work explores the relationship between science and popular traditions. His sculpture, installations and movies are grounded primarily in readings of scientific history. He notes “Paradoxically, my connection to science arises from my own incapacity to understand it properly, and from the distance that separates me and my subject. I try to reproduce that distance in my works, juxtaposing everyday objects and scientific concepts, in order to produce questions about how we perceive the world.”

In this, his first solo show in the United States, Rodolphe Delaunay will allow his new work – made in Baltimore – to confront earlier works produced in France. The exhibition is titled after a 17th century poem by philosopher and scientist Margaret Cavendish. Like a prism decomposes light into the many colors of the visible spectrum, this poem uses language to reveal the phenomena ruling the universe as an explorable array. The show regards the perceptions we have of natural forces and constants – gravity, the speed of light, magnetism – both as collective thought experiments and as individual linguistic experiences.

This exhibition will be the fourth of the ICA Baltimore’s solo artist project series, and its first collaboration with Current Gallery. Similar to the Institute’s artist-directed retrospectives, these projects are intended to showcase a single artist’s work.

Gallery Hours: weekends 12-4pm or by appointment
http://rodolphe.ultra-book.com/
http://www.currentspace.com/
www.icabaltimore.org

Current Space
421 N. Howard St., Baltimore, Maryland 21201

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