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Scene Seen: Paul Daniel at Project 1628

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By Jack Livingston

Paul Daniel is the creator of many large scale public art projects in the Baltimore region which consist of modernist kinetic outdoor sculpture. This exhibition included his rarely seen colorful geometric paintings and small-scale kinetic sculpture prototypes.

Read more about the artist and listen to an audio interview with the artist conducted by Ben Levy in 2014 by visiting this page on BmoreArt.

Project 1628 is a non-commercial gallery and event space located in the first floor of a large historic Bolton Hill row house. It is a gem of an exhibition space—-the result of beautiful restoration. Marcia Hart, an architect who renovated the building, lives and works upstairs and operates the space.

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Project 1628
1628 Bolton Street,
Baltimore MD 21217
Sunday October 11, 2015 2:00 – 5:00 PM
www.project1628.com

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