Art AND

Art AND

How to make decisions, build community and kinship, and create spaces for liberation

Like a good therapist, Populoh’s inquisitive nature gets anyone in conversation with her to view the world from a new perspective.

The art jeweler, vocalist, and BMA program manager is constantly thinking about metal—for its malleability and its permanence

Largely self-taught, Beale now mostly allows her intuitive process to guide her from design to realization of new pieces.

Kris Fulton of Sophomore Coffee on hospitality, inspiration from 'Cheers,' caramel macchiatos, and more

Fulton wants Sophomore to be a place for people to have experiences—some of them hopefully a little more profound than my remembrance of being sweaty and late—a place where friends can gather and conversations can be sparked.

The sculptor talks about moving to Baltimore during the pandemic, thinking with your hands, and singing to your plants

Lucien’s work is an investigation of how everyday materials can function as metaphors recalling an absence or intimacy of the human body

How the sculptor selects materials, why Baltimore is her 'Bermuda Triangle,' and what goes into the hour-long pandemic salad

Adapting and problem solving excite Maghazehe and motivate her materially centered sculpture practice.

His murals dot Baltimore City and are immediately recognizable for their realism, sense of color, and strong, often political narratives

"Our abilities are not proprietary and should not be hoarded. If someone needs assistance producing a mural, I try to make myself available."

Constantly pursuing the feeling of learning something new, Bathgate finds himself experimenting on the edge of the technologies he employs

It’s important to Bathgate that his works be makeable, at least by someone with his extremely specific skill set, which he admits only a few people in the world possess. 

The T. Rowe Price Foundation President talks about community self-determination, sharing resources, and hanging out with Prince

"What communities are asking for is to be heard and to determine their own futures."

The 2020 Sondheim winner talks about balancing family and studio time, portraiture as power, and symbol systems

Hobbs is the rare sort of person who sets intentions and actually accomplishes them, who revels in being busy and can forgive herself when she falls short of her own extremely high standards.

Baltimore painter Jerrell Gibbs on the myth of failure, the art scene's evolution, the seduction of paint and more

Gibbs' obsession with the topic of painting sits so close to the surface, he is absolutely gleeful to get into it.

The visual journalist and arts administrator highlighting creatives of color and forging communities

“I’m just going to trust my hand to do what it wants to do while I’m having this conversation and not have to go back with a fine-tooth comb to make it perfect.”

Laurie plays with borders and fences, flat spaces and wide-open ones that look like anywhere and nowhere at once

"I try to stress that all the real work in art-making is in the practice and the learning from those little failures along the way."

Ito's work tells how people were affected by nuclear warfare, and how we could be affected again

Born in Tokyo and based in Baltimore, Ito understands himself as a collection of opposites and pursues both sides of those narratives through his open-ended and expansive photography practice.

The natural wine enthusiast and co-owner of Le Comptoir du Vin talks food-industry camaraderie and COVID pivots

Prior to COVID, the restaurant was booked many weeks out. Now they’re making it work through a grab-and-go storefront selling sandwiches, hearty stews, and baked goods to go.

On teaching, art-making, acting, and working with young artists on a recent mural in Upton

This summer he wrapped up his fourth mural with students in Baltimore, which prompts him to describe himself as a “painter who makes mixed-media work that often involves community.”

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