Connect+Collect

Connect+Collect

Transformer’s tiny square footage to outsized contemporary art presence is its own genre-defying artistic practice

Transformer hosts about six exhibitions every year, transmogrifying its 14th & P street shoe-box space each time as far as these artists’ imaginations can push it.

The Current Exhibit at BmoreArt's C+C Space is the First of Three Based on Our City of Artists Book

City of Artists, BmoreArt's first full-length book, sold out in December, but is now available through a second printing

How do we talk about liberty and injustice honestly, intertwined with aspects of race and gender in America?

Liberty & Injustice features labor-intensive, clever, immersive works of art that captivate and inform.

Rice makes art that fills in this gap in our brains and busts open the myth of innocence around whiteness in America.

Rice’s work is so successful because she uses documents, data, maps, and other tools that create the foundation of her lived experiences as a middle-aged white woman in America to create large-scale, labor-intensive, craft-based pieces whose effect is simultaneously visual and conceptual.

Alyssa Dennis, TLaloC, in Conversation with AIA Architects Randy Sovich and Violeta Fiorino

A Podcast-style recording of our May 25 Talk at C+C with the artists and architects, along with photos by Jill Fannon and Vivian Doering

An Artist's Growth from Architectural Illustration to Herbalism

“All buildings are living systems, and I wanted to live in a building where the builder ⁄ designer knows and feels this in their bones.”

Connect + Collect Artist Talk with Jordan Tierney, Adam Stab, Lee Davis and Anand Pandian

A BmoreArt Gallery Discussion and Event with the Ecological Design Collective

Tierney’s mixed-media assemblages link humans and climate

The objects Tierney employs trigger memories and personal associations, but they also represent systems, histories, industries and labor, and the environmental impact of it all.

In TLaloC’s 'Orbis Tertius: Hlaer to Jangr,' vibrant inflatable pieces filled the space from floor to ceiling, gleaming like alien objects, their purpose and meaning inscrutable.

In an economic and political environment where artists are accustomed to scarcity, the notion of excess space is indeed otherworldly.