Visual Art

Visual Art

The future is unclear, but making and experiencing art is more essential than ever

These ten exhibits of 2020 provide a fractured but highly ambitious roadmap, messy and democratic and full of brilliant tangents, the perfect puzzle for a precarious and undetermined future.

Seeing the paintings in “I Can’t Wait To See You” is a synesthetic event

Looking at Sahlehe's paintings feels like listening to Solange’s When I Get Home, Alice Coltrane’s Journey in Satchidananda, and Pharoah Sanders’ "Harvest Time."

A performance protest featuring a cast of Baltimore-based artists and bright yellow paint

Zohore’s new performance, enacted across the street from the BMA’s iconic marble steps, co-opts the literal subject of Da Vinci’s “The Last Supper” and considers the museum’s deaccessioning through the lens of religious sacrifice.

BmoreArt's print journal examines power within the context of individual art practices, communities, and institutional structures

Issue 10: Power is BmoreArt's second print journal released since Covid-19 closures

Laurie plays with borders and fences, flat spaces and wide-open ones that look like anywhere and nowhere at once

"I try to stress that all the real work in art-making is in the practice and the learning from those little failures along the way."

Diptychs from February 2020, capturing moments just before the shutdown, and the months that have followed

"I think of them as meditations on how injury is unavoidable and what that means for how we care for one another."

The exhibition title, Skully, comes from a popular game Owens played as a child in Druid Heights, just a mile away from Bolton Hill, the site of CPM, a new art gallery

Viewed as movements, these abstracts are maps that retrace Owens’ process, the steps he took to arrive at the finished series.

A White Artist Examines A Personal and Collective Legacy of White Privilege

This artwork skips the fraught emotionality of white people’s coming into consciousness about the constructs of race and the iterations of racism, and instead leads the viewer straight into an intellectual headspace.

Ito's work tells how people were affected by nuclear warfare, and how we could be affected again

Born in Tokyo and based in Baltimore, Ito understands himself as a collection of opposites and pursues both sides of those narratives through his open-ended and expansive photography practice.

'Black Futures’ explores what it means to be Black and alive right now

While forward-thinking, Black Futures is simultaneously about Black pasts and Black presents.

The untraditional setting of The Shed allows for an intimacy we’re all lacking these days

What we miss the most, what we're leaving behind, and what we're bringing with us post-pandemic

"A Songbook Remembered" at De Buck Gallery

Each of Towns’ quilts in this series is named after a different African-American spiritual song, the roots of which run deep in the Black church and in the Black southern art tradition as well.

An Interview with Betty Cooke

Betty Cooke's jewelry, most of it composed of simple line work constructed in sterling silver, is elegant, timeless, and remarkably wearable.

On view at the Peale at Carroll Mansion

Installed in the mansion, the works are loosely grouped thematically by floors and rooms, tackling themes of segregation, women’s rights and suffrage, colorism, voter suppression, immigrant rights, and white supremacy.

How do we break free? Giving our full attention seems a good place to begin.

Polyphemus, on view at Goucher College’s Silber Art Gallery, is an installation that takes its title from Homer’s Odyssey.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 69